• Security Cameras

    From ROB MCCART@VERT/CAPCITY2/CAPCITY to POINDEXTER FORTRAN on Fri Apr 27 16:52:00 2018
    By: Nightfox to poindexter FORTRAN on Wed Apr 25 2018 04:58 pm

    turbocharger, which I heard needs higher-octane gas to run properly. When I was getting the gas filled one time, I asked for the high-octane gas, but on my receipt I saw that they put in the regular, lowest-octane gas.

    Yeah, it'd run Ok, but predetonation (pinging) would be a problem.

    Ha, that reminded me of my misspent youth when I had a heavily modified Chevelle SS with full race everything and 12.5 / 1 compression ratio.
    (575 H.P.. 0 to 60 in 3.5 seconds.. 0 to 155 mph in 11 seconds..)
    Normally I could ONLY run high test gas from Sunoco in it, even other
    high test didn't run properly. One day I found myself almost out of
    gas so, to get to a station, I grabbed a gallon of gas from the supply
    we had for the lawn mower. It actually didn't seem to run all that badly,
    but when I got to the pumps, I couldn't shut the engine off. I wouldn't
    say it sounded too smooth but the pre-ignition was steady enough it would
    have run all day with the ignition off. I finally had to put on the brakes
    and dump the clutch in gear to stall it. (pinging.. right..) B)

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  • From Dumas Walker@VERT/CAPCITY2 to ROB MCCART on Sun May 6 18:46:00 2018
    high test didn't run properly. One day I found myself almost out of
    gas so, to get to a station, I grabbed a gallon of gas from the supply
    we had for the lawn mower. It actually didn't seem to run all that badly,
    but when I got to the pumps, I couldn't shut the engine off. I wouldn't
    say it sounded too smooth but the pre-ignition was steady enough it would have run all day with the ignition off. I finally had to put on the brakes and dump the clutch in gear to stall it. (pinging.. right..) B)

    I wonder what was in it? <GRIN>

    Here, our lawnmowers always took the same kind of gas the car did (although some mowers run on a gas-oil mix, mine never did), so the only thing I
    might have to worry about would be that the gas in the mower can would be
    old.

    Mike

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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to ROB MCCART on Mon May 7 06:37:07 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: ROB MCCART to POINDEXTER FORTRAN on Fri Apr 27 2018 04:52 pm

    Ha, that reminded me of my misspent youth when I had a heavily modified Chevelle SS with full race everything and 12.5 / 1 compression ratio.
    (575 H.P.. 0 to 60 in 3.5 seconds.. 0 to 155 mph in 11 seconds..)
    Normally I could ONLY run high test gas from Sunoco in it

    In Redwood City, CA, near an affluent town called Woodside, there was a UNOCAL 76 station with a 104 octane pump. People would come down from the hills in old barely street-legal race-prepped Porsches, Ferraris, and Lamborghinis to fill up.

    I used to get my Camry smogged there.

    --pF

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  • From Chai@VERT/AMIGAC to poindexter FORTRAN on Mon May 7 23:13:23 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: poindexter FORTRAN to ROB MCCART on Mon May 07 2018 06:37:07

    UNOCAL 76 station with a 104 octane pump. People would come down from the hills in old barely street-legal race-prepped Porsches, Ferraris, and Lamborghinis to fill up.

    I've never even seen a Ferrari in my state. Corvettes and Porsches is about as nice as it gets.

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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to Chai on Tue May 8 06:33:55 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: Chai to poindexter FORTRAN on Mon May 07 2018 11:13 pm

    I've never even seen a Ferrari in my state. Corvettes and Porsches is about as nice as it gets.

    Nicest ever had to be an original Ford GT40. Woodside is a pretty posh neighborhood - Steve Jobs lived there, as does Larry Ellison, and most anyone who's who in Silicon Valley executive circles. That, or Atherton, CA.

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  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to Chai on Tue May 8 09:37:09 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: Chai to poindexter FORTRAN on Mon May 07 2018 11:13 pm

    I've never even seen a Ferrari in my state. Corvettes and Porsches is about as nice as it gets.

    I rarely see a Ferrari where I am, but I've seen them every so often. Last month I was getting new license plate tags and going through the emissions testing station and saw someone with what looked like a Ferrari going through the emissions testing station. For some reason it seemed funny to me to see someone with a Ferrari at the emissions testing station..

    Nightfox

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  • From KF5QEO@VERT/MAINLINE to Dumas Walker on Tue May 8 13:40:41 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: Dumas Walker to ROB MCCART on Sun May 06 2018 06:46 pm

    Here, our lawnmowers always took the same kind of gas the car did (although some mowers run on a gas-oil mix, mine never did), so the only thing I
    might have to worry about would be that the gas in the mower can would be old.
    Over here the only lawn mowers that I can think of that use a gas/oil mixture is lawn boy. Not every weed eater I've seen takes gas/oil mixture, and every boat motor I've seen for outboards takes gas/oil mixture... Inboards tend to be car engines, so they should just take straight gas.

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  • From ROB MCCART@VERT/CAPCITY2/CAPCITY to DUMAS WALKER on Tue May 8 01:14:00 2018
    >> One day I found myself almost out of
    >> gas so, to get to a station, I grabbed a gallon of gas from the supply
    >> we had for the lawn mower. It actually didn't seem to run all that badly,
    >> but when I got to the pumps, I couldn't shut the engine off. I wouldn't
    >> say it sounded too smooth but the pre-ignition was steady enough it would
    >> have run all day with the ignition off. I finally had to put on the brakes
    >> and dump the clutch in gear to stall it.

    I wonder what was in it? <GRIN>

    The engine you mean ?
    This was back around 1971 when you could buy a decent new car for about
    $6000. My 66 Chevelle SS had a leftover big valve (fuely?) Corvette 327
    in it, installed in the factory. That was a stock 375 HP engine and I
    had a $10,000 engine job done on it to boost things up a bit..
    I told them to ignore Horespower, 327's make lots of that easily, and to concentrate on torque. It was built on a dyno where they could measure
    such things and, when finished, it was 575 HP and 475 ft lbs of torque.

    It ate a Corvette clutch in less than 5000 miles so I had a specialty
    shop put a modified Chrysler Hemi clutch in it. They ran the same clutch
    in their 800 HP Camaro dragster so they guararnteed it wouldn't slip..
    They forgot to mention the clutch pedal pressure needed to hold it in..
    You didn't want to be stuck in a stop and go traffic jam for long..
    (My tiny girlfriend at the time - 89 lbs - wanted to drive it. I didn't
    think that was a good idea but said she could give it a try. I was saved
    having to worry about it when she attempted to push in the clutch and
    just slid up the seat instead.. B)

    Because the engine was built attached to a dyno they could do things
    like swap cams and carbs and such to see what gave the best results.
    They tried 3 different cams and a 6-pack (3 x 2 bbl carbs) and settled
    on an 8" Edelbrock manifold with an 883 cfm Holly dual feed, double
    pumper 4 barrel carb.

    Lots of suspension work as well - it would lift the front tires a bit
    shifting into 2nd. Lakewood Ladder Bars and heavy air shocks in back
    plus 1500 lb overloader springs in the front. It rode like a tank until
    you got over 115 mph.. Cragar SS mags with 14" wide Indy Rain Tires on
    the back and 4.5" wide tires on the front.

    I was 17 when I got that car.. Built it up (from 425 HP at the time)
    in the second year and had it about 4 years. Learned the hard way
    that engines built up that much last about 10,000 miles before needing
    to be done again.. Expensive hobby for a kid in highschool working
    part time until I graduated..

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  • From ROB MCCART@VERT/CAPCITY2/CAPCITY to POINDEXTER FORTRAN on Tue May 8 16:34:00 2018
    Normally I could ONLY run high test gas from Sunoco in it

    In Redwood City, CA, near an affluent town called Woodside, there was
    >a UNOCAL 76 station with a 104 octane pump. People would come down
    >from the hills in old barely street-legal race-prepped Porsches,
    >Ferraris, and Lamborghinis to fill up.

    Where I was (Brampton, Ontario, Canada) at the time the typical high
    test gas was 99 to 101 octane where the Sunoco was either 102 or 104
    but the difference was enough that I would notice it under 'stress'.
    (The engine was designed to redline at 10,000 rpm.)

    I always found it funny when kids would say they were running high test
    is normal cars to make them go faster, when in reality the higher octane
    tends to lower horsepower if you don't really need it because it ignites
    more slowly.
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  • From MIKE POWELL@VERT/CAPCITY2/CAPCITY to ROB MCCART on Tue May 8 18:30:00 2018
    I wonder what was in it? <GRIN>

    The engine you mean ?

    Actually, I meant I wonder what was in the lawn mower fuel that made it different that the fuel you normally put in it. But, now that you mention
    it, I was curious about the engine, too. :D

    This was back around 1971 when you could buy a decent new car for about $6000. My 66 Chevelle SS had a leftover big valve (fuely?) Corvette 327
    in it, installed in the factory. That was a stock 375 HP engine and I
    had a $10,000 engine job done on it to boost things up a bit..
    I told them to ignore Horespower, 327's make lots of that easily, and to concentrate on torque. It was built on a dyno where they could measure
    such things and, when finished, it was 575 HP and 475 ft lbs of torque.

    Yeah, the 327, at least back then, was an awesome HP engine. That is
    getting a lot of torque out of one.

    They forgot to mention the clutch pedal pressure needed to hold it in..
    You didn't want to be stuck in a stop and go traffic jam for long..
    (My tiny girlfriend at the time - 89 lbs - wanted to drive it. I didn't
    think that was a good idea but said she could give it a try. I was saved having to worry about it when she attempted to push in the clutch and
    just slid up the seat instead.. B)

    LOL, I am guessing she did not ask to drive it again? <GRIN>

    I was 17 when I got that car.. Built it up (from 425 HP at the time)
    in the second year and had it about 4 years. Learned the hard way
    that engines built up that much last about 10,000 miles before needing
    to be done again.. Expensive hobby for a kid in highschool working
    part time until I graduated..

    Yeah, most racing engines don't even go that far before needing a rebuild.
    That much power takes a lot out of them. When I was younger I always
    wanted enough $$$ to be able to have cars as a hobby. I am nearing 50 now
    and I just don't see that happening. :)

    Mike

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  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to KF5QEO on Wed May 9 09:50:22 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: KF5QEO to Dumas Walker on Tue May 08 2018 01:40 pm

    Over here the only lawn mowers that I can think of that use a gas/oil mixture is lawn boy.

    I'm not sure I've seen a lawnmower that uses a gas/oil mixture for fuel. The lawnmowers I've used use the same gas that cars use, though they do use oil separately for lubrication.

    I just bought a new lawnmower a couple months ago. I ended up buying a gas mower, but I was thinking about buying a battery-powered lawnmower. Seems like an electric/battery powered mower wouldn't have the issues of needing gas & oil and might be simpler to operate. I wasn't sure if they'd be as powerful though.

    Nightfox

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  • From Gela@VERT/VALHALLA to Nightfox on Wed May 9 13:26:11 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: Nightfox to KF5QEO on Wed May 09 2018 09:50 am

    I'm not sure I've seen a lawnmower that uses a gas/oil mixture for fuel. Th

    I've frequently seen lawnmowers, weed whackers / line trimmers, bicycle add on engines, teen motorcycles, etc all using two stroke engines requiring gas/oil mixture. They're simpler to build and maintain than a four stroke engine. Two stroke engines are still quite popular, especially in yard maintenance.

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  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to Gela on Wed May 9 12:24:05 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: Gela to Nightfox on Wed May 09 2018 01:26 pm

    I've frequently seen lawnmowers, weed whackers / line trimmers, bicycle add on engines, teen motorcycles, etc all using two stroke engines requiring gas/oil mixture. They're simpler to build and maintain than a four stroke engine. Two stroke engines are still quite popular, especially in yard maintenance.

    I've heard about 2-stroke engines being used, but I never really knew they used a different fuel mixture.

    Nightfox

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  • From MRO@VERT/BBSESINF to Nightfox on Wed May 9 16:30:13 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: Nightfox to KF5QEO on Wed May 09 2018 09:50 am


    I'm not sure I've seen a lawnmower that uses a gas/oil mixture for fuel.
    The lawnmowers I've used use the same gas that cars use, though they do use oil separately for lubrication.

    i havent either. maybe older less powerful mowers had it.

    I just bought a new lawnmower a couple months ago. I ended up buying a gas mower, but I was thinking about buying a battery-powered lawnmower. Seems like an electric/battery powered mower wouldn't have the issues of needing gas & oil and might be simpler to operate. I wasn't sure if they'd be as powerful though.


    better to have gas and 5 bucks or so will last you for 5 mows
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  • From Dumas Walker@VERT/CAPCITY2 to KF5QEO on Wed May 9 17:00:00 2018
    Over here the only lawn mowers that I can think of that use a gas/oil
    mixture is lawn boy. Not every weed eater I've seen takes gas/oil mixture, and
    every boat motor I've seen for outboards takes gas/oil mixture... Inboards tend
    to be car engines, so they should just take straight gas.

    Now that you mention it, the last time I used a mower that took the gas/oil mix, I was about 15 years old and it was my neighbor's Lawnboy. :)

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  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to MRO on Wed May 9 16:58:00 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: MRO to Nightfox on Wed May 09 2018 04:30 pm

    I just bought a new lawnmower a couple months ago. I ended up buying
    a gas mower, but I was thinking about buying a battery-powered
    lawnmower. Seems like an electric/battery powered mower wouldn't have
    the issues of needing gas & oil and might be simpler to operate. I
    wasn't sure if they'd be as powerful though.

    better to have gas and 5 bucks or so will last you for 5 mows

    Why do you think gas is better? I'm not sure about the cost-effectiveness of a battery-powered lawnmower vs. gas, but I was thinking maintenance-wise, a battery-powered mower might be easier to maintain. Gas-powered lawnmowers require oil (for lubrication), and after a while they might start to smoke or develop other problems related to a gas engine that wouldn't happen with an electric engine. I suppose an electric engine could have its own issues though.. Also you wouldn't have to go buy gas for it, you could just recharge the battery.

    Nightfox

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  • From Gela@VERT/VALHALLA to Nightfox on Wed May 9 20:43:26 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: Nightfox to Gela on Wed May 09 2018 12:24 pm

    I've heard about 2-stroke engines being used, but I never really knew they u a different fuel mixture.

    It's completely different, but it's for a practical reason -- two stroke engines don't contain an oil reservoir or sump/pump system to keep the pistons lubricated. In fact, in four stroke engines, the oil specifically binds in with the piston rings to create a seal between the two sides of the engine.

    In contrast, a two stroke adds oil in some ratio to the gasoline (usually 87 octane, whatever's cheapest will do) to keep all the contact parts operating smoothly. Different machines will have different fuel/oil mixture ratios. A characteristic difference between a two stroke engine and a modern four stroke is the wraspy noise they make, and the blue smoke due to the oil being burnt in the combustion chamber.

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  • From ROB MCCART@VERT/CAPCITY2/CAPCITY to MIKE POWELL on Wed May 9 16:47:00 2018
    I wonder what was in it? <GRIN>

    The engine you mean ?

    Actually, I meant I wonder what was in the lawn mower fuel

    Right.. well it wasn't pre-mixed with anything at least but it was
    just regular gas.

    concentrate on torque. It was built on a dyno where they could measure
    >> such things and, when finished, it was 575 HP and 475 ft lbs of torque.

    Yeah, the 327, at least back then, was an awesome HP engine. That is
    >getting a lot of torque out of one.

    Yes, it surprised the guys building it that they could get that much.
    They built another 327 in a Chevy II at the same time doing it the way
    they usually did it and got about 750 HP out of it for less money, but
    only about 360 ft lbs of Torque..

    Learned the hard way
    >> that engines built up that much last about 10,000 miles before needing
    >> to be done again.. Expensive hobby for a kid in highschool working
    >> part time.

    Yeah, most racing engines don't even go that far before needing a rebuild.
    >That much power takes a lot out of them.

    When I sold the car it was down to about 425 HP but the kid who bought it
    never knew any different. Within a few weeks he ended up rolling the car showing off. He wasn't hurt fortunately but maybe he learned something..

    I remember the day this kid fell in love with my car. He mentioned a friend
    who had a 289 Mustang with Thrush Mufflers and shackles and a 4 barrel carb
    and he said his friend told him it was a 12 second car (1/4 mile drag race)
    I told him if there'd been no work done inside the engine, forget that it
    was just a 289, there's no way it was a 12 second car.. I took him for a
    quick ride and I had just switched to second gear, about 20 mph, and I
    told him to watch my feet, I wasn't going to touch (dump) the clutch,
    just ease on the gas.. and the car sat up and started smoking the tires..
    ..and they continued to smoke for 1000 ft, and then I let off the gas and
    we were only going about 30 mph.. I told him THAT'S what a 12 second car
    can do.. (11.7 seconds actually)

    I also was building custom motorcycles at the time. I had very expensive hobbies in highschool.. All the male teachers hated me.. B)

    All on my own dollars BTW.. Worked nearly full time hours all the way
    through highschool.

    When I was younger I always wanted enough $$$ to be able to have cars
    >as a hobby. I am nearing 50 now and I just don't see that happening. :)

    Maybe in your retirement.. B) It looks like I'll have more spare
    cash when I fully retire than I do at the moment, and your expenses
    generally go down, although you do have to allow for spending more
    on 'entertainment' on your time off if you don't have cheap hobbies.
    (This is further complicated if you have a wife helping you spend..) B)

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  • From MRO@VERT/BBSESINF to Nightfox on Wed May 9 23:23:44 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: Nightfox to MRO on Wed May 09 2018 04:58 pm

    better to have gas and 5 bucks or so will last you for 5 mows

    Why do you think gas is better? I'm not sure about the cost-effectiveness of a battery-powered lawnmower vs. gas, but I was thinking maintenance-wise, a battery-powered mower might be easier to maintain. Gas-powered lawnmowers require oil (for lubrication), and after a while they might start to smoke or develop other problems related to a gas engine that wouldn't happen with an electric engine. I suppose an electric engine could have its own issues though.. Also you wouldn't have to go buy gas for it, you could just recharge the battery.


    gas lawn mowers last a long time.
    they seem to have more power. batteries dont last forever and end up being dudes.

    my family owned motels and i would cut the grass for extra cash in the summer. i used the tractor for the big stuff, but i used gas mowers a lot.
    if you treat them well they last a long time.
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  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Nightfox on Thu May 10 14:33:00 2018
    Nightfox wrote to KF5QEO <=-

    Over here the only lawn mowers that I can think of that use a gas/oil mixture is lawn boy.

    2 stroke lawnmowers are common here, I've got one, and 2 stroke engines require the gas/oil mix (usually 25:1). But 4 stroke engines are common too.


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  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Nightfox on Thu May 10 14:34:00 2018
    Nightfox wrote to Gela <=-

    I've heard about 2-stroke engines being used, but I never really knew
    they used a different fuel mixture.

    Yes 2 stroke engines require oil added to the fuel.


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  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Nightfox on Thu May 10 14:42:00 2018
    Nightfox wrote to MRO <=-

    Why do you think gas is better? I'm not sure about the
    cost-effectiveness of a battery-powered lawnmower vs. gas, but I was thinking maintenance-wise, a battery-powered mower might be easier to maintain. Gas-powered lawnmowers require oil (for lubrication), and
    after a while they might start to smoke or develop other problems
    related to a gas engine that wouldn't happen with an electric engine.
    I suppose an electric engine could have its own issues though.. Also
    you wouldn't have to go buy gas for it, you could just recharge the battery.

    Electric is mechanically simpler. The biggest weakness of electric is the energy storage - batteries store a lot less energy than a tank of gas, though the technology developed for automotive use has really improved battery capacity all round. I'd be interested to see how well a battery powered mower goes, in terms of power and running time on a charge, as well as recharge time.


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  • From Gela@VERT/VALHALLA to MRO on Thu May 10 10:37:47 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: MRO to Nightfox on Wed May 09 2018 11:23 pm

    a battery-powered mower might be easier to maintain. Gas-powered lawnmow

    We actually bought the Snow Joe two stage 48v battery powered snow blower last season. I think the electrical and battery technology is good, but the problem with these devices is they're made of plastic. We had a belt drive, and the belt would slip against the teflon gearing under heavy loads. Maybe by design, but we still felt it was made cheaply.

    We had calculated the cost of running an electric appliance vs a gasoline appliance, and figured that the electric would be nicer due to 1. decreased cost to run, 2. no warm up requirements in certain weather, 3. no need to tune anything up, 4. your "fuel" is all bought ahead of time in numbers of charges per battery cell. I think electric appliances, lawnmowers included, do make sense if you're going to be stable in your living situation for a long enough period of time to see the battery/fuel source exhaust itself. (Un)fortunately, we moved to an apartment complex where they do our yard care for us, so we sold them off to the highest sucker.. I mean, bidder. :)

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  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to MRO on Thu May 10 10:14:55 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: MRO to Nightfox on Wed May 09 2018 11:23 pm

    gas lawn mowers last a long time.
    they seem to have more power. batteries dont last forever and end up being dudes.

    my family owned motels and i would cut the grass for extra cash in the summer. i used the tractor for the big stuff, but i used gas mowers a lot. if you treat them well they last a long time.

    True, they'll last a while if you treat them well.

    You could (theoretically) buy a new battery when the battery fails. Gas lawn mowers don't last forever either.. I just recently replaced our old gas lawn mower which was getting pretty hard to start and smoking a lot. I'd think a battery-powered lawnmower would have fewer parts & require less (no piston, no oil required, etc.) and thus might last longer.

    Nightfox

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  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to Vk3jed on Thu May 10 10:20:36 2018
    Re: Re: Security Cameras
    By: Vk3jed to Nightfox on Thu May 10 2018 02:42 pm

    Why do you think gas is better? I'm not sure about the
    cost-effectiveness of a battery-powered lawnmower vs. gas, but I was

    Electric is mechanically simpler. The biggest weakness of electric is the energy storage - batteries store a lot less energy than a tank of gas, though the technology developed for automotive use has really improved battery capacity all round. I'd be interested to see how well a battery powered mower goes, in terms of power and running time on a charge, as well as recharge time.

    I'd think being mechanically simpler could mean they would last longer with less maintenance. And as far as the battery charge, I was looking at some battery-powered lawnmowers several months ago and saw some that (I think) would last up to 30-40 minutes per charge, which would be plenty of time for my
    lawn.

    Nightfox

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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to Nightfox on Thu May 10 11:20:21 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: Nightfox to Gela on Wed May 09 2018 12:24 pm

    I've heard about 2-stroke engines being used, but I never really knew they used a different fuel mixture.

    They use the oil mixed in with the gas to lubricate the engine.

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  • From Hawkeye@VERT/MASHBBS to Nightfox on Thu May 10 12:25:22 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: Nightfox to Chai on Tue May 08 2018 09:37:09

    I rarely see a Ferrari where I am, but I've seen them every so often. Last month I was getting new license plate tags and going through the emissions testing station and saw someone with what looked like a Ferrari going through the emissions testing station. For some reason it seemed funny to me to see someone with a Ferrari at the emissions testing station..

    Where I live it's very common to see Ferraris and Porsches. Living nearby German it's even normal to see them at maximum speed :) Autobahn is very nice. Driving on the second lane at 200kph (125 mph) and getting passed by someone driving 300+ kph (187+ MPH) is very nice (my opinion). They all watch out and participate on this, in the Netherlands (my home country) maximum speeds are 100-130 kph (62-81 mph) but nobody watches to other drivers. The germans do... very good, even I have a licenseplate from the Netherlands they respect other drivers very well... like they know the others' car potential.

    HAWKEYE

    - MASH BBS - mash4077.ddns.net - The Netherlands -

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  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to Hawkeye on Thu May 10 13:36:02 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: Hawkeye to Nightfox on Thu May 10 2018 12:25 pm

    Where I live it's very common to see Ferraris and Porsches. Living nearby German it's even normal to see them at maximum speed :) Autobahn is very nice. Driving on the second lane at 200kph (125 mph) and getting passed by someone driving 300+ kph (187+ MPH) is very nice (my opinion). They all watch out and participate on this, in the Netherlands (my home country) maximum speeds are 100-130 kph (62-81 mph) but nobody watches to other drivers. The germans do... very good, even I have a licenseplate from the Netherlands they respect other drivers very well... like they know the others' car potential.

    I think it's good to not put too many restrictions on things such as driving speed, but at the same time, sometimes I wonder why people are in such a hurry that they want to drive so fast.

    Maximum speeds in my country vary (highway speeds in my state tend to be 55mph/88kph to around 70mph/112kph in some states). People here sometimes aren't very careful drivers though. I see people who don't use their turn signals, try to turn or change lanes too soon, using their cell phones while driving, etc.. It would be good if people here were more careful drivers.

    Nightfox

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  • From MRO@VERT/BBSESINF to Vk3jed on Thu May 10 16:47:14 2018
    Re: Re: Security Cameras
    By: Vk3jed to Nightfox on Thu May 10 2018 02:42 pm

    Nightfox wrote to MRO <=-

    Why do you think gas is better? I'm not sure about the cost-effectiveness of a battery-powered lawnmower vs. gas, but I was thinking maintenance-wise, a battery-powered mower might be easier to maintain. Gas-powered lawnmowers require oil (for lubrication), and after a while they might start to smoke or develop other problems related to a gas engine that wouldn't happen with an electric engine.
    I suppose an electric engine could have its own issues though.. Also you wouldn't have to go buy gas for it, you could just recharge the battery.

    Electric is mechanically simpler. The biggest weakness of electric is the energy storage - batteries store a lot less energy than a tank of gas, though the technology developed for automotive use has really improved battery capacity all round. I'd be interested to see how well a battery powered mower goes, in terms of power and running time on a charge, as well as recharge time.


    i saw a guy trying to cut his grass with a mower and extention cord. seemed like a pain in the fucking ass.

    all the pros use gas so that speaks volumes on gas vs battery or electric
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  • From MRO@VERT/BBSESINF to Gela on Thu May 10 16:48:23 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: Gela to MRO on Thu May 10 2018 10:37 am

    Re: Security Cameras
    By: MRO to Nightfox on Wed May 09 2018 11:23 pm

    a battery-powered mower might be easier to maintain. Gas-powered lawnmow

    We actually bought the Snow Joe two stage 48v battery powered snow blower last season. I think the electrical and battery technology is good, but the problem with these devices is they're made of plastic. We had a belt drive, and the belt would slip against the teflon gearing under heavy loads. Maybe by design, but we still felt it was made cheaply.

    We had calculated the cost of running an electric appliance vs a gasoline appliance, and figured that the electric would be nicer due to 1. decreased cost to run, 2. no warm up requirements in certain weather, 3. no need to tune anything up, 4. your "fuel" is all bought ahead of time in numbers of charges per battery cell. I think electric appliances, lawnmowers included, do make sense if you're going to be stable in your living situation for a long enough period of time to see the battery/fuel source exhaust itself. (Un)fortunately, we moved to an apartment complex where they do our yard care for us, so we sold them off to the highest sucker.. I mean, bidder. :)



    so is the snow joe decent for snow blowing? i almost bought one.
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  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Nightfox on Fri May 11 07:14:00 2018
    Nightfox wrote to Vk3jed <=-

    I'd think being mechanically simpler could mean they would last longer with less maintenance. And as far as the battery charge, I was looking
    at some battery-powered lawnmowers several months ago and saw some that
    (I think) would last up to 30-40 minutes per charge, which would be
    plenty of time for my lawn.

    I'd need 2 or 3 charges :)


    ... The word 'meaningful' when used today is nearly always meaningless.
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  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to MRO on Thu May 10 15:41:17 2018
    Re: Re: Security Cameras
    By: MRO to Vk3jed on Thu May 10 2018 04:47 pm

    i saw a guy trying to cut his grass with a mower and extention cord. seemed like a pain in the fucking ass.

    hence why they have battery-powered lawnmowers.

    all the pros use gas so that speaks volumes on gas vs battery or electric

    True, although I'd take that with a grain of salt. Sometimes it seems that there are a lot of traditionalists who prefer an older technology mainly because that's how it has been done before. Theoretically, I'd think a battery powered lawnmower could last longer because it's mechanically simpler. You'd just need to replace the battery when it stops holding a charge long enough to mow your lawn.

    Also I'm not a professional landscaper, I just want to mow my own lawn at home..

    Nightfox

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  • From Gela@VERT/VALHALLA to MRO on Thu May 10 19:43:37 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: MRO to Gela on Thu May 10 2018 04:48 pm

    so is the snow joe decent for snow blowing? i almost bought one.

    Actually, it did a great job in even heavy, wet snow. We really liked it. Our only concern was with plastic parts of the chassis and the teflon gearset. I think the slipping we experienced was a designed safety fallback to prevent the motor torque from destroying the blades should something get stuck and not set off the shear pins. But yes, we thought it was a worthy machine. We also got the snow broom for smaller areas. They both worked admirably. And even better, we didn't wake up neighbors, because it's quiet.

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  • From Dumas Walker@VERT/CAPCITY2 to MRO on Thu May 10 19:25:00 2018
    i havent either. maybe older less powerful mowers had it.

    I don't know about the power comparison, but in the late 1980's the newer Lawnboys were all gas/oil mix, but our pre-1970 Briggs & Stratton was a gas mower. If I had to guess, the B&S was more powerful but I don't know that.

    I have had two B&S mowers in the past 10 years, both are gas powered, too.

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  • From Dumas Walker@VERT/CAPCITY2 to MRO on Thu May 10 19:27:00 2018
    if you treat them well they last a long time.

    My experience is that the engines outlast the decks on gas push mowers.

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  • From MIKE POWELL@VERT/CAPCITY2/CAPCITY to ROB MCCART on Thu May 10 19:19:00 2018
    All on my own dollars BTW.. Worked nearly full time hours all the way through highschool.

    That is impressive. I only worked part time hours and could still barely
    keep my grades up. :o

    Maybe in your retirement.. B) It looks like I'll have more spare
    cash when I fully retire than I do at the moment, and your expenses
    generally go down, although you do have to allow for spending more
    on 'entertainment' on your time off if you don't have cheap hobbies.
    (This is further complicated if you have a wife helping you spend..) B)

    Well, I don't currently have one of those to worry about, so maybe things
    won't be quite as tight as I think they will be. :D

    Mike

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  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to MIKE POWELL on Fri May 11 10:09:48 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: MIKE POWELL to ROB MCCART on Thu May 10 2018 07:19 pm

    All on my own dollars BTW.. Worked nearly full time hours all the way
    through highschool.

    That is impressive. I only worked part time hours and could still barely keep my grades up. :o

    Yeah, I'm not sure how someone could fit in a full-time job while in high school. My classes + homework took about as much time as a full-time job.

    Nightfox

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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to Nightfox on Sat May 12 08:46:55 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: Nightfox to MIKE POWELL on Fri May 11 2018 10:09 am

    Yeah, I'm not sure how someone could fit in a full-time job while in high school. My classes + homework took about as much time as a full-time job.

    I had a friend whose parents didn't pay for anything he had -- he was a last child, next oldest sibling was 10 years older. Everything - clothes, music, hobbies, toys, his bike - he paid for.

    He did all that and graduated with good grades in AP classes.

    It's possible when you don't have a choice I suppose.

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  • From MRO@VERT/BBSESINF to Nightfox on Sat May 12 18:24:35 2018
    Re: Re: Security Cameras
    By: Nightfox to MRO on Thu May 10 2018 03:41 pm

    because that's how it has been done before. Theoretically, I'd think a battery powered lawnmower could last longer because it's mechanically simpler. You'd just need to replace the battery when it stops holding a charge long enough to mow your lawn.

    Also I'm not a professional landscaper, I just want to mow my own lawn at home..


    you should talk to some people that have battery powered mowers.
    there's got to be a very good reason why people prefer gas.

    i would say the power of the gas mowers and how much longer they last are a determinating factor.
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  • From Jagossel@VERT/MTLGEEK to MRO on Sun May 13 07:44:55 2018
    Re: Re: Security Cameras
    By: MRO to Nightfox on Sat May 12 2018 18:24:35

    you should talk to some people that have battery powered mowers.
    there's got to be a very good reason why people prefer gas.

    i would say the power of the gas mowers and how much longer they last are a determinating factor.

    I own a home, but I don't own a lawn mower, let alone a gas powered mower. I have an electric (outlet powered, not battery powered) weed eater that gets the job done. The property is too small to use a lawn mower.

    Almost bought a reel lawn mower but it was too expensive. I just don't want to have to deal with a small engine and having fuel canisters with in easy reach of my kids (4 and under). The garage I have doesn't have shelves to put the fuel canister on where it's out of reach. As it goes with a small yard with a hill in the middle of the backyard, I can't get a shed in there either.


    -jag
    Code it, Script it, Automate it!

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  • From Hustler@VERT to Nightfox on Mon May 21 16:08:46 2018
    Re: Security Cameras
    By: Nightfox to MIKE POWELL on Fri May 11 2018 10:09 am

    All on my own dollars BTW.. Worked nearly full time hours all the
    way through highschool.

    That is impressive. I only worked part time hours and could still
    barely keep my grades up. :o
    Yeah, I'm not sure how someone could fit in a full-time job while in high school. My classes + homework took about as much time as a full-time job.

    Unless of course they were able to cheat on their exams. ;-)

    HusTler

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